Fear of the Three C’s

Yesterday, after getting a great night’s rest, I woke up to my go to morning newsletter to find out that Amazon passed up on RDU for HQ2. With 20 finalist locations, Amazon opted to split the wealth between two finalists: Northern VA and Long Island, NY. That’s all well and good but, once again, North Carolina missed out on a major bid. Now, let’s talk about why.

Southern comfort is a thing. No, I’m not talking about the whiskey. I’m talking about the twang when (some) Carolinians talk and our hospitably sweet diabe-tea when you visit. But it’s cool, right? Folks come from up north and think our slower lifestyles and “fast” moving traffic is neat. Well, so do we. In fact, we love it so much that it’s become a hinderance.

According to a poll, only 43% of local citizens strongly supported Amazon HQ2 being located in the Raleigh area. So, you mean to tell me that you’re not in favor of 25,000 new jobs with an average salary of $150,000? Why is that? Sounds crazy to me. No, excuse me. It’s not crazy. It’s fear.

News flash Carolinians: A large number of us are afraid of the 3 C’s. You’ve never heard of them so you don’t know what they are. That’s ok. I just realized it this morning but I’ve known it my entire life (which is why, as much as I love home and will be back, I’m getting the hell out of here for a while so I can be around some less fearful people). The three 3’s are *drumroll* change, commute, and competition.

I’ll start with the most obvious, which is change. In the south, people fear the unknown because, it’s unknown. This is why Georgia gubernatorial candidate Brian Kemp can run an openly racist campaign advertisement saying he’ll take the role of ICE into his own hands and still (almost) win an election. Non-white immigrants represent change and the south likes things slow, steady, and at it’s own pace. This is why they fought so hard to keep slavery, Jim Crow, and mandatory minimums that look like everything they have always known. Change is scary. Amazon represents progress that non-Southerners will bring and that progress will require North Carolinian culture to change. That’s C1.

C2 is the commute. In North Carolina, we like our cars. We like our trucks and our sedans and our sports cars and our nice cars (say it with a thick southern accent and you’ll see where that speedway in Charlotte got its name). Automobiles are status symbols. ‘Round here *Memphis Bleek voice*, we drive by people who stand at bus stops with our noses up in the sky. In more developed cities, that doesn’t happen. I’ve been on the subway in New York and LA and seen A- or B-list celebrities on there too. It’s normal. But, for some reason, N.C. would rather continue fixing our messed up, pothole-filled roads and destroying the atmosphere with gas guzzlers instead of figuring out a sustainable and reliable transit system.

Therefore, you know what another reason of those who weren’t strongly for Amazon being located here is? They say we don’t have the infrastructure to handle it. That’s code for they don’t want to deal with the traffic. I have family members in central NJ who catch a train to NYC daily for work and then back. We’ve been spoiled when it comes to our commutes and now we don’t want to forego that.

C3 is competition. For some reason, we don’t feel like competing with the outside world. We don’t want Amazon flying in their “foreign” (from other states but still American citizens) team to take jobs that North Carolinians should have. What sense does that make? Now the “foreigners” aren’t here and neither are the jobs, which means neither is the growth. When companies like Amazon come to places like Raleigh, multiple industries boom. But, when they over look us, professionals who would’ve come here and started new business go elsewhere. Students who would’ve come to one of the Triangle’s over ten colleges and universities will now look elsewhere to get their education. Homes that should be built by our construction workers are going to be built in Northern VA and on Long Island. When we don’t want to compete, what we’re really saying is that we don’t want to win. We don’t want to be the best. We just want to be left alone to live with our Southern comfort.

Folks, Carolinian or not, take this as a lesson. You don’t want to be like present-day North Carolina. Hopefully, losing this bid isn’t what wakes us up. Let’s be honest with ourselves: we probably would’ve lost to a bigger city either way. What should wake us up is our attitude to even being considered for the bid.

Oh, and since we’re talking about Amazon, go grab my long-time friend Joe‘s new book, #ClosingSZN. It just went live last week. I got mine in the mail from Amazon today (I’m a hardcopy kind of guy but you can get the digital version and dive in right now if you want).

 

Make embracing the 3 C’s a priority.

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Manipulate the System

I’ll kick it off by saying that being a young professional in today’s society is a double-edged sword that most Baby Boomers do not understand. I talk with my mom and grandma often and, when I am looking for a new job, they think it should be easy for someone with my skills and experience to find employment. And it would be very easy were it 1980 or before. Shoot, before 2000, you could walk into a company, shake someone’s hand, and make an excellent first impression when you handed a crafted résumé and cover letter to a receptionist or, if you were lucky, hiring manager.
That was then. Now we have to navigate through automated systems that often fail horribly at selecting the right person for the job. There are so many qualified candidates that human beings don’t put their eyes on applications until they’re sifted through by A.I. That’s the system, that’s the way it is, maybe we will be able to go back one day but, today, that’s reality.
Boom. I’ve covered myself. So what do we do now? We manipulate the unfair system to our advantage. We use the tools that do help us develop as young professionals to make ourselves stand out. We take the time to throw industry jargon into our LinkedIn profiles. We add key words from the job description to our résumé and cover letters to make sure our applications are selected by the A.I. systems. We go to the networking events so we can get in the rooms that the decision makers are in and, when in those rooms, we have something to say.
Technology makes things easier but it makes truly connecting more difficult. No one understands that more than those of us who learned with both a pencil at the first half of our childhood and a keyboard during our adolescence. We went to college, got out weighed down by debt, and the jobs weren’t there. Many of us are within 3 years of 30 on either side and we wonder why we haven’t made it to where The Wonder Years and The Cosby Show said we should be by now. Well, it’s because of tech. No one was ready for it. But, unless The Walking Dead is a premonition, it’s here to stay. So let’s hedge our bets and learn this new system. Take full advantage of apps like LinkedIn, Glassdoor and Monster. Invest in your professional development and personal branding. It’s the only way we’ll advance.
Oh… and don’t let Boomers or anyone else shame you for not “having it together” yet. You’ll get where you’re supposed to be when you’re supposed to be there.
Make trusting the process a priority.

Move Forward With Confidence

We’ve all had those interviews. You know, the ones where your confidence was through the roof, you and the interviewer connected, and your outfit was spot on for the culture. You reached out to me and I got your résumé in tip-top shape, with a cover letter to match. The hiring manager told you to expect a call in the next couple days.

A few days go by but was she talking about business days or days days? A business week goes by and you decide it’s time to reach out to HR. You find out that no news really is good news. Their timeline got thrown off but they’re still considering the candidates. Definitely a relief.

They finally call back on the second date they gave you and, this time, the news isn’t so good. They’ve gone with an internal candidate. But how? You did all the right things. You were genuine, but impressive. Well-dressed but not over-dressed. Articulate but not pompous.

While I interview well a strong majority of the time, I’ve had my share of interviews that didn’t yield the results I expected. For a long time, I thought I’d done something wrong. But, truth be told, I can pull out all my best answers, shirts, and slacks and still be the wrong person for the position.

Don’t be too hard on yourself. Rejection doesn’t mean you’re not qualified or a great person for the field. It just means the position isn’t for you.

This post is just as much for me as for you all. Your time is coming. Don’t give up. I won’t either.

 

Make pressing forward a priority.

An Open Letter: This Thanks Is For You

Dear Everyone,
It is an empowering thing to see us breaking down society’s rules of what it means to be successful and, instead, define it as our happiness. Certainly, many of us stunt a bit on S.M. but we are making progress and that’s what matters. I love scrolling down my timeline and seeing my friends defining success and joy for themselves.

Whether they just got out the bing or started their own business or got a promotion or switched careers or decided to pursue dreams of spitting bars or finished reading a book or learned a new word or quit their job to travel the world, I’m happy for you. You may have just saved your first $100 or $100,000. I am happy for you. You may have just gotten engaged or announced you’re having a kid out of wedlock. I am happy for you. I am happy because I know that every step you take, even if it is a challenging one, is another step toward your destiny. You are going to be great and you’re getting greater each day you do something that causes love in and for yourself to grow.

Life is short. If you aren’t loving it, you’re wasting it.

Sincerely,
Deryle

Bro, The E-Mails Keep Coming!

E-mail can be a beast during a regular hour/day/week, depending on how busy you are. So imagine being away for 2 months with no connection except during the hours you’re either in your Airbnb or at some coffee shop that has complimentary WiFi. iMessages stack up but I’m at a point in life where I’m more apt to look for e-mails from clients, recruiters, and professionals who want to connect and make magic happen. And let’s not forget the awesome newsletters I get daily and actually try to skim (there is some valuable and inspiring content in those things!). Then there are the junk e-mails I signed up for to get free stuff. Before you know it, my inbox is overflowing and it’s only been 36 hours since my last thorough purging.
So, how do I combat this? Well, first, I go through and DELETE the junk that I know I’m not going to need. It’ll just take up valuable space (y’all know you can run out of free Google space) and I know I’m never going to want to reference the expirational“BOGO 🍔” from a favorite chain at home. And the “70% off Swimming Trunks For the First Day of Summer” from my go to inexpensive retailer? I’ll pass (this time). You get the gist.
After digitally tossing the useless stuff, I archive the daily newsletters that are more than a day old (but I keep those from the last 24 hours incase I need to something fresh to read). I may actually go back and peruse them sometime but it’s going to be when I’m either on a plane/train or searching my mail for something specific and that newsletter just happens to relate. (By the way, Instapaper is the way to go if you identify an article you want to read at another time. Thank me later.)
Lastly, I meticulously go through and try to respond within 24 business hours* to those e-mails that actually look like they’re either:
A) from a loved one;
B) Going to add immediate value to my life;
or C) Require a timely response.
I really suggest that, if you’re on an actual computer, you save time by selecting all unread e-mails and moving through the bulk stages (deletion and archival) that way, in that order. Then pick through the important ones. My goal, when all is said and done, is to keep the inbox with 15 or fewer e-mails after each purge. I’ve been hanging around 20 or 25 this trip but there’s no time like the present to fix that.
✌🏿
How do you manage e-mails when you’re away? Any additional tips? Let me know in the comments.
Make keeping a clean(er) inbox a priority.
*Just because you see an e-mail doesn’t mean
you must respond right away. Take time if you
need to (and can) to craft an appropriate response.

Stepping Into The Right Space

Gone are the days of working somewhere for thirty to forty years. We have more exposure, options and opportunities than any generation before us and we’re not afraid to explore them. We want upward mobility within a defined timeframe and the moment we find that mobility to be outside our reach, we reevaluate how long we need to be in the role.

I know I’m speaking from an extremist point of view. There are many who are doing well in their jobs. I have friends who graduated from undergrad or grad school and have been working for the same place for five years and there is nothing wrong with that. But I also have friends who I can count on to jump from job to job every year or two. Both groups are valid. In this day and age, we need the stabilizers and the innovators, the creatives and the regulators. The envelope must be pushed but it cannot be eliminated.

Still, to those who regulate and maintain the boundaries, I challenge you to keep your options open. In the words of pop sensation Chris Brown, “these (companies) ain’t loyal.” I’ll say it over and over again. We have to, as individuals providing a service to a corporation, know our worth and, if that worth is unappreciated, we have to figure out either how that can be rectified or where it would be more appreciated. I believe in your ability to bring value into a space that you’re passionate about. The question is, are you willing to take the risk to find out where that space exists and then invest the effort required to be a valuable member of that space?

 

Make professional development a priority.